Top 10 Best Aft Decks on Luxury Yachts

August 24, 2016

Written by Rebecca Pascoe

What makes a superior aft deck? To an extent, the response to this question is personal to each individual who answers. The aft deck is perhaps the most important location on a yacht, whether it is a private or charter yacht. One of it’s core roles is the social interface between the outside ocean world and the yacht’s interior. The aft deck is certainly prime real estate in luxury yacht terms, however there are many different design responses attempting to achieve the ultimate.  Lets have a look at a selection of them.

Kometa at dawn (70m alu) by Heesen Yachts

Kometa at dawn (70m alu) by Heesen Yachts

Sleek and sexy performance sailing yachts naturally have a beamy layout for spacious aft decks, whilst large motor yachts are designed specifically with social areas and aft decks in mind and they often have multiple decks available. Aft decks provide space for al fresco dining, relaxing on and enjoying cocktails at sunset. They provide access to the water for swimming or boarding the tender and they present a first impression to visitors when the yacht is at anchor.

“One of it’s core roles is the social interface between the outside ocean world and the yacht’s interior. The aft deck is certainly prime real estate..”

Some of the top 10 best aft decks on luxury yachts are quite unique in appearance and styling. With comfortable couches and large tables, they offer the best place on board a luxury superyacht to chill out with friends or family.

Below is a personal selection of the top ten vessels that have glorious and amazing aft decks:

1. Quatroelle – the 88m Quatroelle is all about massive exterior aft decks where guests can feel the breeze while watching the sun rise and set. Clever touches include technical marvels, a section of the big stern platform lowers into the sea. The yacht also has exterior stairs on all of its five decks for easy access to cabins. After a day in the sun, there’s nothing better than cooling off in the bridge deck infinity pool.

Superyacht QUATTROELLE  Aft Deck Pool

Superyacht QUATTROELLE Aft Deck Pool

2. Indian Empress – this superyacht is famous for starry parties on her sprawling aft deck. There are flowing rounds of seating, a marble bar, plenty of space to dance the night away. Dance to music provided by a professional DJ positioned on the sun deck above. The Indian Empress is very popular with people from around the world and makes an excellent charter yacht. The upper aft deck table alone can seat about 30 guests. Hold a party and you’ll essentially be running a nightclub.

Indian Empress

Indian Empress

3. Alfa Nero – the Alfa Nero has one of the best aft decks you can find on a luxury yacht. This trail blazer of a superyacht has an awesome eye-catching aft deck that looks cool and trendy. The floor of the 7 x 3.5 metre pool lifts hydraulically to deck level and turns the aft deck into a dance floor or helipad. You’ll just have to remember if you’re choppering your guests home at midnight or inviting them to stay on for a late night swim. As well as the aft deck, there’s a club-like upper salon.

Alfa Nero Aft

The Alfa Nero Aft View

4. Maryah – everyone likes a good mystery. The Maryah is ultra-private but what we do know about her is quite fascinating. The hull began life as a Russian research vessel launched by the Polish Szczecinska Yard in 1990. After the rebuild this superyacht had sweeping curves, accommodation for 54 guests, a cinema and a helipad. Included in the design were three aft decks, a sun deck, a beach club and a profusion of fold-down terraces.

Maryah

Maryah

5. Luna – her main aft deck is vast, about one third of the yacht’s overall length. When the weather cools, the massive beach club provides a chic shelter with an on-deck feeling. Other explorer yachts look quite dull in comparison to the Luna. The huge aft deck is the perfect area for a cocktail party or any other special occasion like al fresco dining by candlelight.

Explorer Yacht LUNA'S Aft Pool

Explorer Yacht LUNA’S Aft Pool

6. Zefira – winner of the Sailing Yacht of the Year Award in 2011’s superyacht awards, the Zefira is ideal for loafing on deck during long, lazy yacht charter vacations with family and friends. She is big and sleek with long clean lines and uncluttered decks. The beautifully designed aft deck dovetails perfectly with the light and bright Remi Tessier interior design. Start your day with a delicious breakfast on the aft deck.

Zefira

Zefira

7. Ester III – this 66 m motor yacht’s interior spaces have been planned as carefully as the exterior. With protection from the sun, wind, rain and cold, the aft deck has a stunning bar up top including a large glass backed swimming pool. Relax on one of the sun beds during the day and then enjoy a tasty meal in the evening outdoors on the large aft deck that has been transformed into an exquisite dining area.

Ester III

Ester III

8. Invictus – the Invictus is all about volume. The beautifully designed, spacious water-level aft deck is made larger still by a vast, fold-out, bathing platform and behind it all, there’s a well-stocked bar. It’s no wonder that the aft deck is one of the most popular spots onboard. The garage beyond the aft deck can hold two 8.35 m tenders including a gorgeous Comitti.

Invictus

Invictus

9. Galactica Star – the sleek design and space is what’s so impressive on the superyacht, the Galactica Star. Access to the awesome aft deck is made easy thanks to two brilliantly lit stairways either side of the beach club. This is ideal for guests onboard. The water, either in the main deck pool or off the bathing platform, is never out of reach. Relax on one of the aft deck’s sun beds while watching the sun go down at anchor.

Galactica Star

Galactica Star

10. Axioma – is ideal for a superyacht holiday, perfect for outdoor living. The slightly different, yet attractive aft deck is supplemented with a bridge deck bar, spa pool and mouth-watering al fresco dining options. It’s a chilled out, private feeling aft deck, if you need any more sun this is the place to be. The swimming platform also transforms from the grand entrance into a sprawling space for sunbathing, just a few steps from the sea and the pool.

Axioma

Axioma

If you love yachts and yachting as much as the team at CharterWorld, get in touch for the vacation of a lifetime on your ideal yacht, at the best price.

THE AUDI Hamilton Island Race Week Mid-Week Weekend

August 24, 2016

Written by Mike Smith

News from Hamilton Island, Australia:

Sailing - Audi Hamilton Island Race week 2016

Sailing – Audi Hamilton Island Race week 2016

Layday came early for the Audi Hamilton Island Race Week fleet despite best efforts by the race committee to get some divisions racing out on the Eastern course area, in the Turtle Bay vicinity.

That fleet of cruisers and cruising multihulls waited patiently offshore for close to four hours, filling in time swimming, sunbaking, barbequing and following three humpback whales which obligingly glided close enough for photo opportunities.

“It was a frustrating day, we did what we could,” said principal race officer Denis Thompson. “There wasn’t stable breeze to send the championship boats out, we got away with it yesterday, but didn’t want to risk it today given the forecast. The rest of the fleet was moved around all over the place and even went into a starting sequence, and then the breeze collapsed. Everyone tried their hardest; Huey didn’t play the game today.”

The Australian Yachting Championship fleet never made it off the dock, an early postponement signalling the long islands race from Dent Passage was cancelled. Hours later those crews were officially released to enjoy the afternoon at Hamilton Island.

Day three’s forecast was always going to be challenging for the race committee with very light winds under 8kts predicted to oscillate between north and east.

Despite a brave effort to lay a windward/leeward course for the Eastern fleet, when a light north-easter finally set in, the cow bell was rung on the water early afternoon and all racing was abandoned for the day.

Wednesday’s layday means the record Race Week fleet effectively now has a mid-week weekend breaking up two halves of the annual series that wraps up on Saturday, August 27, 2016.

PR By Crosbie Lorimer & Lisa Ratcliff

PENDENNIS SEND WORD: REFIT OF M.Y. CONSTANCE COMPLETE

August 22, 2016

Written by Mike Smith

PR: Pendennis Shipyard has just completed an extensive 17-month refit of the 46.33m motor yacht Constance, which was originally built by Feadship as Paminusch in 1986. Arriving initially in Falmouth as Jana, she was delivered by cargo ship in December 2014, and entered into the 90m Hall 1 at Pendennis in March 2015 following refit preparation works. At that time Constance still retained many of her original 30-year old systems and engine-room equipment, and a surveyor’s report made the boat uninsurable. The remit for the refit was to ensure the structural integrity of the yacht complied to offshore cruising requirements, to modernise systems and equipment not only improve efficiency but also to comply to emission regulations, and to refresh the interiors to the style of the new Owners. This project was undertaken completely in-house by the specialist trades at Pendennis, with Yacht Management provided by Master Yachts.

 Constance


Constance

During her time at Pendennis all bridge and engine room equipment and systems were replaced, whilst insulation was improved throughout and tanking systems refabricated as necessary.

Refurbishment of the Owner and Guest areas was carried out by Pendennis’ interior design team, with existing woodwork removed, restored and meticulously reinstated by Pendennis’ Joinery team. Bringing the yacht up to current regulatory requirements including the latest MCA Large Yacht code “unrestricted Service” was of key concern, particularly as Constance was previously limited to short range use only. Special attention was paid to damage stability; this required the addition of further watertight compartment subdivisions to meet the most up to date regulations.

The crew area, galley, and laundry had a more extensive overhaul as the whole area was rebuilt and new galley and service equipment integrated, complemented by bespoke-made built-in furniture, resulting in a completely modernized crew area. Externally two new deck cranes were installed and new teak decking laid across all areas. A full topsides, bulwarks and superstructure repaint by the specialist paint team completed the refresh of the boat.

How To Pick The Best Yacht Charter Boat

August 22, 2016

Written by Mike Smith

So, what’s the answer? What exactly makes a yacht, charter friendly?

Here CharterWorld brings together the experience and thoughts of some of the very best & brightest luxury charter broker professionals to answer one question: ‘What type of boat feature(s) make for the best luxury yacht charter?’

This question and its answers are vitally important for yacht charterers looking for the ideal holiday. It provides a list of yacht features that you should definitely consider when shopping for what will be the right charter yacht for you. You should reflect upon these general yacht features whether you are chartering the largest superyacht or a far smaller crewed sailing catamaran.

Heesen Yacht Galactica Star

Heesen Yacht Galactica Star

However, these questions are also important if you are considering purchasing a yacht that you might also charter out. The more ‘charter friendly’ features a boat offers, the higher the price you can charter the yacht for and the more charter weeks you will receive. Similarly, yacht designers and builders also consider these charter features, because a charterer’s desires are fundamentally similar to a yacht owner’s demands.

Well, here is the top 20 most important boat features to consider when choosing the ideal luxury yacht charter holiday:

1. Value – ‘This one is a ‘no-brainer’. You want more for your money, right?’

What is the value of the yacht, or the charter price, like in comparison to other boats on the market, when considering all the following considerations. Is the yacht offering a special rate? Can your broker negotiate a better price for you? Does it offer great relative value even without a ‘discount’? How does the price compare to luxury onshore accommodation for the number of guests you will have aboard (including all related travel, restaurant and other expenses)?

Sailing can be great value, and fun!

Sailing can be great value, and fun!

2. Crew – ‘How capable are the crew and do they compliment you, your activities and style?’

For those with experience who are ‘in the know’ this is considered to be THE most important component for the best charter (yacht). How well do the crew compliment you and your intended activities? Although crew are professionals, their personalities and their quality differ markedly from yacht to yacht. This is a crucial aspect to assess with your broker, who will have likely meet the crew personally (and if they haven’t they will have access to other assessments and reviews of each yacht’s crew). How good is the chef and do you favour the type of cuisine they most experienced with? Do you need a jet ski or dive instructor aboard? What about a masseuse or beauty technician? Do you enjoy a relaxed and friendly style from the crew or a more formal professional one?

Superyacht Crew

Superyacht Crew

3. Condition – ‘New or old…but what shape is the yacht in now?

This one is very important but also impossible to know without the expert advice from your charter broker. They have likely inspected the yacht and crew recently and if they haven’t then they can fall back on a vast network of yachting professionals who have experienced the yacht and can let them know. There is also a network of charterers who are happy to provide their valuable feedback on the yachts they have recently holidayed on. Importantly condition is not necessarily directly correlated to the age of the yacht. Sometimes even new yachts have teething problems and may not be in ideal shape for a number of reasons. Conversely, older yachts can often be refitted like new or have a fantastic crew onboard who keep the boat spick and span.

Kometa at dawn (70m alu) by Heesen Yachts

Kometa at dawn (70m alu) by Heesen Yachts

4. Feedback on the yacht- ‘Brokers rely on a network of feedback and reviews.’

You can ask your broker if there is a collection of recent feedback on the yacht and it’s crew. This can make very interesting and important reading when choosing between potential boats.

Charter Yacht Hana

Charter Yacht Hana

5. Layout or configuration- “will the designed format enhance the enjoyment of your charter?

The layout on a yacht refers to the interior (and exterior) design layout. Where are the cabins positioned in relation to the master cabin and how many are there. How any cabins have double beds and how many have twins? Are there any fold out pullman bunks to add to the number of guests that can be accommodated? How well does the outside dining and lounging spaces connect with the inside ones?

70M Galactica Super Nova upperdeck

70M Galactica Super Nova upperdeck

6. Location – ‘Where is the yacht and does this make a great charter destination?’

Where is the boat located? Europe, The Mediterranean, The Caribbean or elsewhere? Is this a popular and appropriate destination for a yachting holiday at this time of year? Do you need to cover relocation fees or is the yacht already there? Have you considered your intended destination fully? Would you like more information and suggested itineraries for this location and others? Ask your broker.

Swan yacht ODIN

Swan yacht ODIN Sailing in the Caribbean

7. Multiple social living areas – ‘Do they function well and interconnect effectively?’

It’s important to have more than one type of social area. How many different types are there and how do they interconnect? Holidays are about getting together with friends and family. The best yacht designs enhance the social aspect of the charter party.

PJ 72m Salon

PJ 72m Salon

8. Water toys – ‘A yacht charter is all about a fun ocean lifestyle after all.’

What does the boat offer in terms of fun equipment? How comprehensive is the list and what does it include? Do the toys suit you and your group? Sailing dinghies or jet skis? How old are the toys and do the crew have any particular skills in relation to operating the toys or teaching guests how to use them. This also includes the boat’s main tender. How big is it, how powerful is the engine(s) and what condition is it in?

Heesen Inception and water toys

Heesen Inception and water toys

9. Outdoor decks – ‘Exterior social areas are even more important than the interior ones.’

The space and design of the outdoor areas is important because this is where you will typically spend most of your time. Chances are it will be high summer or at least warm, after all. How well do they interconnect, what features to they have, how much sun shade is there and what is the access to the water and views like?

Belgin Yachts

Belgin Yachts

10. Wow factor – ‘Does it please you to imagine being on that boat?’

The latest contemporary yachts often have a lot of wow factor, but so to do many larger yachts or more traditional or famous ones. This point is personal to each individual but there are certain boats that most agree have ‘wow factor’.

Yacht Moonstone

Yacht Moonstone

11. Quality of yacht or yacht maker – ‘What is the Rolls Royce of the ocean? What is the Ferrari?

This is more important to consider when buying a yacht. A charter is more about the overall holiday experience over a week or three. You don’t have to be invested emotionally with the idea of owning the yacht long term, like the owner does. However, generally the better the yacht maker or builder the better the quality and overall satisfaction on your yacht. The top brands are considered the best because of an unrivaled emphasis on quality, so ask your broker how favourably the yacht maker is considered generally in the industry. To what degree is this type of yacht coveted?

superyacht Suerte

superyacht Suerte

12. Jacuzzi/Pool – ‘What better way to relax on a yacht?’

Do you want one? Feel like sipping some bubbles while soaking in bubbles? The Largest yachts actually have swimming pools on the aft deck, so this might be nice.

superyacht Jacuzzi

superyacht Jacuzzi

13. The Master cabin

How large is it and is it separated or proximate to the other accommodation? Does the decor inspire? Does it look like the sort of space you can relax and recharge?

MY LEGEND - Master suite rendering

MY LEGEND – Master suite rendering

14. The Tender quality

A new, large and powerful tender is important. You will spend some time either transferring to shore or playing with water toys on the tender, so make sure it is decent.

Yacht Coral Ocean

Yacht Coral Ocean

15. Her Speed – ‘Fast is good but only given the right weather conditions.’

How much moving around do you intend to do? A fast yacht will mean more time relaxing on location, however the weather also means you cannot always go fast on fast boats, or even move from harbour at all.

Galactica super nova aft

Galactica super nova aft

16. Her Stability – ‘Everyone enjoys poise on the ocean.’

Is the yacht full displacement and does it have stabalisers, catamaran or mono hull. Once again this might be a question to ask your broker.

Sailing yacht KOKOMO

Sailing yacht KOKOMO

17. History / provenance

Some of the older traditional yachts have hosted many interesting or famous people over the years and this may well be a point of difference or interest for you.

Blohm and Voss yacht Savarona

Blohm and Voss yacht Savarona

18. Dining tables (inside and out)

Alfresco dining in summer s one of the most enjoyable aspects of yachting, so ensure that the layout, position and size of the external dining is suitable to your requirements.

Kokomo

Kokomo

19. The yachts suitability to the location or intended itinerary

Is the yacht suitable? If there are larger seas and you wish to travel larger distances perhaps a displacement motor yacht will have the size and seaworthy stability that you require? If you plan on many short trips along a coastline known for calm seas perhaps a fast semi displacement yacht will give you more experiences for your money? How long will you be living aboard? Have you considered sailing as part of the yacht charter experience?

Monaco means luxury yachting!

Monaco means luxury yachting!

20. The Crew- ‘The crew, the crew, the crew!’

This is the most important single aspect to a wonderful luxury yacht charter vacation, so I have mentioned it again.

If you bear these considerations in mind you (and your broker) will certainly pick the best yacht available for you, and at the best price. All the very best for your next luxury yacht charter vacation from the expert CharterWorld team.

Gallery Of The Images Published in July

August 21, 2016

Written by Mike Smith

Regates Royales Yacht Competition Cannes_Bay French Riviera France

Regates Royales Yacht Competition Cannes_Bay French Riviera France

 

Sailing yacht Jupiter available for New England charter

August 18, 2016

Written by Rachael Steele

Luxury yacht JUPITER

Luxury yacht JUPITER

Turn heads this summer as you sail along in comfort and style aboard 30.5m/100ft sailing yacht JUPITER. Built in 1989 by Cantieri Navali Lavagna, her refit in 2013 updated her appearance and modernised her equipment for the height of convenience.

The interior layout provides a salon area consisting of a generous sofa perfect for lounging around on whilst watching television or listening to music. Adjacent to the salon is the indoor dining area that comfortably seats up to 8 guests in air conditioned surroundings.

Sailing yacht JUPITER - Main salon and dining area

Sailing yacht JUPITER – Main salon and dining area

Sailing yacht JUPITER provides plenty of opportunity for sunbathing on her generous deck layout: To the aft there are double sunpads and an equally large foredeck leaves open possibilities for rest and relaxation or as an area for exercise. The guest cockpit features wrap-around seating for intimate alfresco dining and the Bimini shade can be removed for greater exposure to the gentle New England climate.

On board is an impressive selection of water toys, including water skis, 2 dinghies, 8 sets of snorkelling gear, a laser sail boat, wakeboards, 2 paddleboards and fishing gear. A hammock and barbecue provide additional amenities while on your luxury charter.

Sailing yacht JUPITER - Alfresco dining in the guest cockpit.

Sailing yacht JUPITER – Alfresco dining in the guest cockpit.

Luxury yacht JUPITER accommodates up to 8 guests in her 1 Master suite and 3 twin cabins. Up to 3 crew can live aboard to ensure a relaxed and serene journey throughout the New England beaches and coves.

Sailing yacht JUPITER is available for charter in New England this summer and in the Caribbean this winter from €35,000 per week plus expenses. Contact CharterWorld today for more information and answers to your enquiries.

The upcoming 46th Newport International Boat Show

August 17, 2016

Written by Rachael Steele

It’s only one month before the start of the Newport International Boat Show, where visitors of all experience levels can listen in on seminars from trusted industry names and have lessons in powerboating, sailing and much more. The largest event of its kind in the region, the New England based event attracts an international audience and the autumnal changes in foliage make it a spectacular time to take a luxury charter through the region. Find out more about the programme below: The following is a press release from the Newport International Boat Show.

Press Release

NFNP_2016_Logo cmyk LR PRG

 

The Newport International Boat Show. Photo courtesy of Onne van der Wal.

The 2016 Newport International Boat Show will take place September 15-18. Photo courtesy of Onne van der Wal.

THERE’S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE AT THE NEWPORT INTERNATIONAL BOAT SHOW

Region’s Largest Boat Show Announces Activities and Highlights

Newport, R.I. – Newport Exhibition Group, owners and producers of the Newport International Boat Show, announced today the activities and amenities for those planning to attend its 46th annual show. The largest boat show in New England and the ‘kick off’ to the fall boat show season, the Newport International Boat Show provides visitors from around the world a venue to see the latest boats and product offerings from hundreds of manufacturers and dealers, including dozens debuting for the first time in the United States. Set along historic Newport Harbor in the heart of downtown Newport, the show also offers a wealth of education and fun activities for boating enthusiasts of all ages and experience.

At The Helm by Confident Captain offers on the water training for boaters of all experience levels. Professional USCG-licensed and U.S. Powerboating certified instructors will lead students through engaging lessons and important boating strategies to help improve confidence and ability. The program is open to all show attendees and runs all four days of the show. This year, At The Helm has partnered with Boston Whaler as the official powerboat; attendees that choose a powerboat course will get to drive the latest offerings from this iconic brand. For those interested in learning how to sail, “First Sail” has been added to the course schedule; Beneteau America is the official sailboat of the program.

Also for sailors, the experience of a lifetime has just been added to the 2016 At The Helm program. Confident Captain will offer a professional sailing experience on a high-performance M32 catamaran. Participants can sail on a boat recently used for the World Match Racing Tour and one of the most exciting boats on the water.

This year’s show includes CruiserPort University, which will offer a number of classroom-style seminars by world-renowned speakers. Experts in their field: Peter Swanson, Nigel Calder, Paul Comyns, Bob Sweet, Jeremey Davis, Lou Codega, Kim Russo and more will cover important topics for boaters of all experience levels.

Also on tap are weekend workshops offered by Lee Chesneau and Pam Wall. Lee’s courses cover Tropical Cyclone Basics; Rules for Avoidance; and An Introduction to the Surface Pressure Chart. Wall will expand on Outfitting for Blue Water Cruising and share her knowledge of Cruising The Bahamas. Both speakers are legends in their field and chock full of good advice.

Leukemia Cup Regatta Logo LR PRG

The official charitable partner of the Show is the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society‘s Leukemia Cup Regatta. The Environmental Partner is Sailors for the Sea. Both organizations have linked the love of boating to their very vital missions – finding a cure for cancer and ocean conservation, respectively – causes close to the heart of the Newport International Boat Show organizers as well as many show attendees. These non-profit organizations will have booths onsite and attendees will have the opportunity to meet the staff and get valuable information regarding their important missions. The Leukemia Cup Regatta will be in Tent A #47. Sailors for the Sea can be found in Tent A #23.

Sailors for the Sea Logo HR PRG

Visitors on Thursday will have the opportunity to cast their vote for the best new sailboat or powerboat making its U.S. debut in the Newport For New Products People’s Choice Award. One voter will be selected at random to win a $250 American Express Gift Card. Voting ballots are available at all gates. The 11th Annual Newport For New Product winners will be announced on Friday morning. Categories include: Best Sailboat, Powerboat & Products. The Edson Star Award honors exhibitors with the best looking display in the show. While in Newport, guests can also tour America’s newest Tall Ship, the 200-foot SSV Oliver Hazard Perry (OHP). She is the first fully-rigged, ocean going Tall Ship to be built in America in over 100 years. The OHP will be docked on Perry Mill Wharf. Attendees must have a boat show wristband to board. On Saturday from noon to 3 p.m. and on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., the lovely and talented Sailor Donna will entertain children with singing, face painting and balloon art.

New for this year, guests can sign-up at the show to win an 8-day, 7-night all-inclusive vacation at the exquisite Bitter End Yacht Club in Virgin Gorda, British Virgin Islands. BEYC was selected as one of the “world’s best resorts” by Conde Nast Traveler. Look for kiosks throughout the Show site promoting this fabulous vacation get-a-way.
“The programs and activities we offer complement the boats, products and services that our exhibitors bring to our Show,” said Nancy Piffard, show director of Newport Exhibition Group. “The show experience, coupled with Newport’s own amenities such as award-winning restaurants, historic landmarks, fashionable boutiques and galleries, make for a boat show destination that is second to none!”

Expected to draw tens of thousands to historic Newport, the Newport International Boat Show will take place Thursday, September 15th through Sunday, September 18th, 2016 on the Newport waterfront along America’s Cup Avenue in Newport, Rhode Island. One of the largest in-water boat shows in the country, the event will host nearly 750 exhibitors from around the world with an exceptional assortment of boats of every type and style from 15 to 110 feet, and a wide variety of accessories, equipment, electronics, gear and services for boaters.

For more information on the 46th Annual Newport International Boat Show and to purchase tickets, please visit www.newportboatshow.com.

Aerial view from the 2015 Newport International Boat Show.

Aerial view from the 2015 Newport International Boat Show.

The Safest Place to Charter a Private Luxury Yacht

August 17, 2016

Written by Mike Smith

With the recent turmoil in the world, and ever changing political landscapes, cruising on a private yacht is surely the safest way to travel. Not only that but it is the ideal way to see the most beautiful and fun coastlines of the world. A yacht brings both comfort and safety, privacy and freedom. There’s no better way to enjoy a holiday. This is one reason why the yachting industry is booming.

However, in this ever changing world, the safety of some locations is ever evolving. Even though a yacht charter is surely the safest way to enjoy your holiday, I have decided to rank which areas are likely the safest of the safe. I’ve scored the 10 safest places to cruise on your private yacht subjectively, according the following criteria: weather & seas, infrastructure & health care and lastly, violent crime.

The Top 10 Safest Places in the world to enjoy a yacht charter:

Caribbean Yacht Charters by Alexis Andrews

10. French West Indies

A beautiful part of the wider Caribbean cruising area, the centrally positioned French West Indies includes the likes of Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe, and Isle de Saints. This corner of the Caribbean is as ‘classic Caribbean’ as anywhere because so you get the full package of near faultless beaches with white soft sand. It’s certainly not unknown to visiting superyachts, but there are still many a secluded cove to tuck up in and relax at anchor or jettison your gear and dive in for a swim. There are also unspoiled and authentic fishing villages on offer, lush inland rain forests, rugged peaks, exotic fruit & flowers and even hot springs. Natural beauty does not come at the expense of safety here as this part of the Caribbean is mostly know mostly for only petty crime and theft and the Caribbean somehow seems a long way removed from many of the current political problems of the world.

“This part of the world suddenly feels nicely isolated, and thus insulated, from the sometimes crazy problems emanating from globalisation and troubled world politics. It’s almost a taste of a simpler and more naive version of the world as it once was.”

Far flung sailing destinations can be an experience of a lifetime

Far flung sailing destinations can be an experience of a lifetime

9. Thailand

Thailand is the land of the smile, and it also has a fairly well-established yachting industry and infrastructure for South East Asia. In addition, there are some amazing areas to visit on you yacht like Puket, Krabi, Phang Nga Bay, Koh Phi Phi and Ko Lanta and the Similan Islands might be places that your yacht charter broker suggests you consider. There are not a huge number of luxury yachts permanently available in Thailand but there are always superyachts passing through on a world tour that you might like to consider renting.

The Bahamas offers superior ocean landscapes

The Bahamas offers superior ocean landscapes

8. Bahamas

The Bahamas always feels to me like a clean and fresh part of the Caribbean. It certainly doesn’t tend to be as overcrowded as some parts on the water. Safety is pretty good here in terms of crime and what a magnificent place to charter a yacht, especially a yacht with a shallow draft so you can get into all those special bays and beaches. If you like the water and like sea creatures this is the place to come.

Luxury yacht Hana in Italy

Luxury yacht Hana in Italy

7. Italy

Italy is perennial, seemingly almost lost in time sometimes. Italy in the heart of the Mediterranean is also a yachting smorgasbord, offering both culture and natural beauty. Think picturesque bays, amazing food ideal temperature and great nightlife. Think Capri, Sardinia, Portofino. Italians generally have a strong culture and an even stronger sense of community, and in many ways it’s a connected community that makes a place safe. Italy is a yachting powerhouse in the middle of Europe and as yet this country hasn’t specifically been affected as much as many neighbouring countries by recent world events.

Sailing an Oyster 100 superyacht

Sailing an Oyster 100 superyacht

6. Balearic Islands

Perhaps the most relaxed of the major Mediterranean yachting destinations, the Spanish Balearic Islands with great cities like Palma de Majorca have been the heart of sailing in Europe for many a year. Not only is there great sailing here but it’s a bit more low key than some of the other more glitzy Mediterranean hotspots. If you want to charter a sailing yacht, come here because there are plenty to choose from and the is more steady breeze than most other parts of the Mediterranean.

Tropical yacht charters are an evergreen delight

Tropical yacht charters are an evergreen delight

5. Fiji

Not only one of the most beautiful places on earth but also quite possibly one of the safest to visit on your charter yacht. The locals in this South Pacific cluster of magical islands are warm and friendly, with the biggest smiles of anywhere in the world. ‘Bulla Bulla’ is the local’s greeting and it comes with sincere friendliness. Like the rest of the South Pacific, Fiji does get cyclones during the cyclone season but if that time of the year is avoided the weather is nice and safe. Fiji has seen plenty of recent investment in infrastructure from new luxury resorts and marinas to roading. Moreover, despite being so wonderfully isolated, access to the first world countries of New Zealand and Australia is only a 3-4 or so hour flight away.

Heesen Yacht Galactica Star

Heesen Yacht Galactica Star

4. Croatia

It wasn’t a very long time ago that Croatia was only a new and developing yachting location after years of debilitating war. Competing with the rest of the Mediterranean, there was a lot of ground for the country to make up in terms of attracting luxury holiday makers to this beautiful location with thousands of islands. Well Croatia succeeded in not only attracting superyacht clientele to their home but in flourishing as one of the most requested luxury charter destinations in the world. Debrovnick, Korcula, Havar, Split, Sibenik are some of the most well-known and respected hot spots, but there are many others dotted along this amazing coastline. Croatia offers friendly locals, wonderful nightlife and generally a secure and safe environment.

New Zealand is known for sailing and whales

New Zealand is known for sailing and whales

3. New Zealand

The land of the long white cloud is very politically settled and safe and what’s more the locals are also known to be extremely friendly. This together with the fact the country is considered ‘First World’ with a modern first class heath system, means New Zealand is near the top of the safest yachting destinations. It has also seen a huge lift in general tourist numbers recently due to its many interesting and beautiful sights and its relative isolation and safety. While on a luxury yachting holiday you might visit the Bay Of Islands, the Coramandel and even the Marlborough Sounds (in the South), it’s also worthwhile to travel off the yacht inland to visit luxury destinations like Queenstown where you might rub shoulders with the world’s rich and famous. New Zealand has a world class superyacht maintenance infrastructure, so there are plenty of visiting superyachts to take advantage of. And if you like yacht racing like the Kiwis you could enter the Millennium Cup near Auckland.

Monaco means luxury yachting!

Monaco means luxury yachting!

2. Monaco

Anyone who has been to Monaco for more than a day or two knows there is a lot more to the Principality than just fast cars, superyachts, and the rich and famous. The Monégasque locals look after each other well and they also look after their guests. Accordingly, security has always been taken very seriously here and it’s hard to imagine a better protected population in Europe. Of course Monaco has first class infrastructure and the weather is generally mild Mediterranean. Monaco has gone from strength to strength as both a destination for superyachts cruising in the Mediterranean and as a service area with its large marina and luxury yacht focused economy.

Benetti in the Caribbean

Benetti in the Caribbean

1. The BVIs

The British Virgin Islands is a Caribbean yacht charter powerhouse which is popular for many reasons. There are hundreds of successful charters enjoyed here every year. But it’s also relatively very safe. The amazing beaches, bays and climate go a long way but there is also good supporting infrastructure. Crime is moderate for this part of the world and the weather is typically very easy and consistence outside hurricane season. The Caribbean Islands generally score very well with their relative safety, with only some exceptions only as a minority. This part of the world suddenly feels nicely isolated, and thus insulated, from the sometimes crazy problems emanating from globalisation and troubled world politics. It’s almost a taste of a simpler and more naive version of the world as it once was. The BVIs give a yachtsman a smorgasbord of tropical Caribbean delights to explore, Tortola, Peter Island, Virgin Gorda, Jost Van Dyke, to mention a few of the most famous.

Please get in touch with CharterWorld the leading luxury yacht charter expert, to experience the delights of a superior charter holiday. Here are some very happy people who have already.

Cowes Race Week: The final results

August 16, 2016

Written by Rachael Steele

The final results are in after an electric bout of competitive racing as the winning crews from Day 7 vied to hold their positions. In the Daring class, only two points separated the top three competitors while the Dragon and Sonar classes saw strong rivalry for podium positions. Learn more about the crews and the results of the week-long race event in the article below. The following is a press release for AAM Cowes Race Week.

Press release

Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week Daily Round Up Day 8
By Rupert Holmes / CWL

Newsflash header image

High pressure, brilliant sun and a solid westerly breeze again delivered perfect conditions for the final day of Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week. The wind dipped briefly in strength to around 10 knots as a belt of thin cloud moved across the Solent around midday, before increasing to 15 knots with stronger gusts when the sun returned 30 minutes later.

The bulk of the White Group dayboat classes completed their series today. Nigel Grogan’s Rehydrated had already won the Squib class with a day to spare, counting seven points from six races, a performance that also saw him win White Group overall. Emma Baker’s Buccaneer won today’s race, lifting her up to sixth overall, while a second and fourth for Duncan Grindley’s Surprise and Martin Harrison’s Hussar cemented their overall second and third places respectively.

“I am absolutely delighted and feel really proud to be taking the trophy back to Burnham-On-Crouch,” Grogan said. “We had a bit of a shaky start to the week with an OCS on the first day, which put us under a bit of pressure, but from there on we sailed well and managed to gather a string of useful results. It was however, as always in the Squib class, exceptionally close racing throughout.”

The larger boats dominated the Sportsboat class results, with Malcolm Wootton’s Farr 30 Pegasus Dekmarx winning with a day to spare. A win in today’s race helped seal second overall for David and Kirsty Apthorp’s J/88 J-Dream. Lloyd Thornburg’s Farr 280 Fomo took third overall, four points behind J-Dream. Rob and Lucinda Mclean’s Spider Pig headed the smaller boats in Sportsboat Division 2, ahead of two other 1720s, Tom Richardson’s Premier Cru and Stephanie Merry’s Midnight Cowboy.

YETI, J/70 – Copyright Paul Wyeth / CWL

Jack Davies’ Yeti won today’s race for the J/70 class, winning both his class and the Under 25 trophy. Fourth place today was just enough for Ali Hall’s J Curve to retain second overall, one point ahead of Claire Lasko’s Elizabeth. David Atkinson’s Sweaty Betty won the SB20 class with two days to spare, with Robert Corbally and Joe and Tom Hemmant’s L.O.S taking second overall, ahead of Roger Harford’s Red Kite.

Nick Stagg’s China Wight led the Etchells fleet into the start line today, but lost out by having to slow down to avoid being OCS. The class started in such a tight bunch that China Wight was almost spat out the back of the fleet, while series leader Andrew Cooper’s Ice was a nose ahead of half a dozen other first-row boats. He also led at the finish, taking his second win of the week to win the class overall on 11 points. Shaun Frolich’s Exabyte 7 took second overall on 13 points and Rob Elliot’s Bon Vivant third on 15 points.

Only two points separated the top three boats in the Daring class going into their final race, with Giles Peckham’s Dauntless on 16 points and John Corby’s Doublet and Andrew Norton’s Decoy both tied on 18 points. O Laughton-Scott’s Darius looked best placed at the start of today’s race, with Kim, Laurence and Tristan Orchard’s Dancer inshore and Decoy at the outer end of the line also looking good. However, neither Peckham nor Corby were in the front row. The latter was one of the first boats to tack onto port, while Peckham continued on starboard for longer, gradually clawing his way up through the fleet.

Peckham notched up another win, his fifth of the regatta and with another discard kicking in was able to drop the 10th place he picked up on Wednesday to win the class counting only seven points. However, it was a bad day for Corby, who had to count his seventh place today, leaving him second overall on 15 points, one point ahead of Norton.

NAIAD, CHRISTIANNA, Dragon – Copyright Paul Wyeth / CWL

Jenny Stutley’s Chime led the Dragon fleet into the outer end of the line this morning, but had to hold back to avoid starting prematurely, handing an advantage to Martin Makey’s Ganador and Gavia Wilkinson-Cox’s Jerboa. Further inshore Eric Williams’ Ecstatic established a two-length lead on Oliver Morgan’s Christianna, however when they crossed tacks a few minutes after the start the offshore group was ahead. Simon Barter’s Bertie won today’s three-hour race – his first win of the week – nine seconds ahead of Martin ‘Stavros’ Payne’s Bear, with Graham Bailey’s Aimee third. Bailey again won the class overall, on 13 points, ahead of Payne and Wilkinson-Cox.

In the Sonar class David Peerless’ Pisces and Alistair Barter’s (Dragon sailor Simon’s son) Bertie established an early lead off the start line, with Barry Byham and Simon Clark’s Dolphin also getting away cleanly. Today provided a double win for the Barter family, with Alistair leading Dolphin at the finish by 36 seconds, while Peerless took third place. This left Bertie and Dolphin tied on 15 points, with the count back in Barter’s favour thanks to his four race wins.

Sam Jenkin’s Swallow Svala was the best placed boat at the outer end of their start, tacking immediately onto port, leaving Anthony Lunch’s Solitude and Charles Fisher, Richard Thompson and Nigel Glennie’s Migrant leading the starboard tack group away from the line. Migrant went on to win today’s race, his fourth of the regatta, which he finished counting eight points. John Houghton’s Avocet took secured second overall thanks to a second place in today’s race. Solitude and Malcolm Green’s Archon finished the series tied on 14 points, with the count back for third overall resolved in favour of Green thanks to his two race wins.

Jonathan Nainby-Luxmoore’s Redwing Snowgoose 2 started the day with a commanding points lead. However four boats were only two points apart in the race for second overall. Today the fleet was noticeably closer to the line than previously classes in the final 30 seconds before their start. The two boats at the outer end of the line were both OCS, including Snowgoose 2, leaving a tight group of boats, including Nick Rowton-Lee, Rory Morrison and Paul Lacy-Smith’s Banzai ll, Colin and Becky Samuelson’s Toucan, Nicholas Robertson and David McCue’s Musicus and Nick Woolgar and Olav Cole’s Goose, all in the first row. James Wilson’s Quail won today’s race, lifting him up to fifth overall, while third place for Banzai ll secured her position second overall, three points ahead of John Raymond and Christopher Hill’s Harlequin.

The Flying 15 class was again won by John and Rupert Mander’s Men Behaving Badly, who won with two days to spare and took the runner’s up spot in White Group overall. However, the day started with three boats in close competition for second place. Nick Clarke’s Black enjoyed a two point advantage on 16-year-old Will Heritage’s Freddie Flintoff, who in turn was one point ahead of Richard Drabble’s Fram Freyr.

With the wind increasing, Andrew Rutherford’s Double Trouble was early leading into the line, luffed above the outer distance mark, before ducking back to make a perfect start to windward of Black. Fram Freyr also had good speed off the line, popping out in third place right behind the two leaders. Heritage won today’s race, nine seconds ahead of Andrew Millband’s Fifty Fifty, with Black taking third 33 seconds later. Heritage therefore took second overall, three points ahead of Clarke.

In the Mermaid class William Edwards’ Annabelle started closest to the outer end of the line, a length ahead of Guy Mattinson’s Adastra before making an early tack offshore. Noel Dobbs’ Scuttle was also looking well placed, a length ahead of a larger group of mid-line boats. Dobbs was almost 30 seconds ahead of Mattison at the finish today, with Ben Few Brown’s Sheen in third place. Dobbs’ win today, his third of the week, sealed his third place overall, while Mattison wins the class, one point ahead of Few Brown.

LASS, XOD – Copyright Paul Wyeth / CWL

The final start of the day was for the XOD fleet. Series leader, John Tremlett’s Lass responded to the individual recall signal, eventually crossing behind the entire fleet, with the exception of a handful of back markers, on port tack. This left Simon Russell’s Swallow, Neil Payne’s Sirena, Roger Yeoman’s Xcitation and Rory Paton’s XL as the best placed boats, with Michael Martell’s Astralita and Nik Froud’s Venus also looking strong.

Lass worked back up the fleet remarkably quickly, keeping clear air in the big fleet as the fleet tacked past the throngs of spectators on the Green to the west of the Royal Yacht Squadron. At the end of today’s two-hour race Payne held a 12 second lead on James Meaning’s Gleam, with Swallow taking third place 36 seconds later. Lass was able to discard her seventh place to take another overall class win, while Xcitation similarly discarded a disappointing 23rd place to retain second overall. Meaning’s second in today’s race sealed his position in third overall.

Black Group

With the main series for Black Group yachts having concluded yesterday, today’s racing was for individual class trophies. James Gair’s Mills 39 Zero ll was victorious in IRC Class 1, while Jonathan Gardiner’s First 40 Minx 3 won IRC Class 2, and Frank Lang’s X-40 Optim’X IRC 3.

Oliver Legrain’s A35 IBA Sailing Team won IRC 4, while Rob Salter’s J/92 Jackdaw takes away the silverware in IRC 5. In IRC 6 Samantha Flint and Olly Love’s Impala 28 Too Frank took their second win of the week, while Paul Dunstan’s Folkboat Mandarin was victorious in IRC 7

In Cruiser Division A Rob Denning’s Swan 46 Bewick of Cowes led the fleet away from the start, with Phil Munday’s Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 52.2 Great Escape of Southampton a little to leeward. Munday took line honours at the end of the three-hour race, 30 seconds ahead of Denning, but was not able to save his time against the lower rated boat. Simon Grigg and Anne Jackson’s Arcona 370 Arcadian took third place on corrected time, less than two minutes behind Munday.

In Cruiser Division B Janet, Lionel and David Miller’s Swan 38 White Heather took both line honours and first place on corrected time, ahead of Jonathan and Pippa Wallis’ Swan 36 Sheeva and Keith Harding’s Sun Odyssey Reach 4 the Wind.

Cowes Race Week: Day 7

August 16, 2016

Written by Rachael Steele

The penultimate race day at Cowes Week has whittled down the candidates for podium positions, with the Squib class leader already assured first place. Racing concluded for four of the classes in the White Group, with the remainder racing with the Black Group on Day 8. The following is a press release from Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week.

Press Release

Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week 2016 Daily Round Up Day 7
By Rupert Holmes / CWL

Newsflash header image

Competitors and spectators enjoyed simply stunning weather on the penultimate day of Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week. The Isle of Wight and Solent were bathed with unbroken sun, while the westerly wind slowly swung into the south west and increased from 6-9 knots to reach 15 knots at lunchtime, before giving gusts of 20 knots in the afternoon.

The first start from the Bramble line was for IRC Class 3. Adam Gosling’s new JPK10.80 Yes! started the day counting a clean run of first places, putting him seven points ahead of Peter Morton’s JND35 Salvo. Three boats were in contention for third place overall, with Ed Fishwick’s JPK10.80 Redshift on 19 points, Tony Lowe’s First 40.7 Incognito on 20 points and yet another JPK10.80, Niall and Olivia Dowling’s Audrey, on 23 points.

At the start Gosling was uncharacteristically buried among his competitors, but still managed to pull ahead of the fleet to take line honours and an impressive sixth race win on corrected time. With the series for Black Group yachts concluding today it was a performance that earned him a class win and victory in Black Group overall, for the fourth consecutive year. Third place today for Salvo saw her secure second overall, while a fourth for Redshift similarly cemented her third place at the end of the series.

“Aberdeen Asset Management Cowes Week is everything to us,” said Gosling. “We always focus our year on this week so to win Black Group is everything we ever want – it is absolutely fantastic. This is a brand-new boat, we’ve only done three regattas so far, and are still learning how to make the boat go better, so we really didn’t expect to win again.”

GIRLS ON FILM, Fast 40+ – Copyright Paul Wyeth / CWL

In the grand-prix FAST40+ class, Peter Morton’s Carkeek 40 Girls on Film started the day on 9 points, Sir Keith Mill’s Ker 40+ Invictus 10 points and Bill Coates’ Ker 43 Ortra Vez on 12 points. As well as the overall regatta title, today they were also racing for the New York Yacht Club Challenge Cup.

The first start today, from the Black Group Committee Boat in the western Solent, was subject to a general recall. In the restart yesterday’s winner, Otra Vez, was buried at the back of the fleet. However, Coates’ team fought back and by the first bottom mark they were in second place on the water, only a few lengths behind Girls on Film. Otra Vez went on to finish 24 seconds ahead of Girls on Film to claim a second major trophy in two days and secure second overall in the class.

“This is my first Cowes Week, and to be honest I had no idea how important these two trophies were,” said Coates, “but now I fully appreciate the importance and to win both the Britannia Cup and the New York Yacht Club Challenge Cup is extraordinary.”

Morton’s second place today was sufficient to secure an overall win in the class, by a margin of two points. Sir Keith Mills’ Ker 40+ took third overall, just one point behind Otra Vez.

Going into the final race in IRC Class 0 James Bolingbroke’s Ker 46 Lady Mariposa R led the overall standings by a comfortable six points ahead of veteran Dutch sailor Piet Vroon’s Ker 51 Tonnerre 4, with Leeloo, Harold Vermeulen’s MAT1180 four points further adrift in third overall.

Another MAT1180, Eamonn Rohan’s Tschuss won today’s race ahead of Bolingbroke and another Ker 46, Gorm Gondesen’s Shakti. However, this didn’t change the shape of the overall podium.

The top two boats in IRC Class 1, James Gair’s Mills 39 Zero ll and Bruce and James Douglas’ J/133 Spirit of Jacana started the day tied on 10 points, well ahead of Mike Greville’s Ker 39 Erivale lll in third place. A win today for Spirit of Jacana cemented her overall victory, while third place for Zero ll enabled her to comfortably hold onto second, nine points ahead of Erivale lll.

The final result of IRC Class 2 also went to the wire. Two First 40s topped the leaderboard overnight, with Andrew McIrvine’s La Reponse three points ahead of Tor McLaren’s Gallivanter, and superyacht designer Bernard Olesinski’s X-40 Xinska just one point adrift in third place. A win for Xinska today lifted her to second overall, just one place behind La Reponse, who had to count today’s fourth place. Gallivanter finished sixth today, but still held onto an overall podium position in third place.

ANTILOPE, IRC Class 4 – Copyright Paul Wyeth / CWL

IRC Class 4 saw different boats win the first three races before Louis-Marie Dussère’s JPK10.10 Raging Bee slowly emerged as class leader by a narrow margin. With three wins and a second place in the second half of the week, he went into the final day two points ahead of Philippe Bourgeois’ Dunkerque-les Dunes de Flandre.

However, the leaderboard was shuffled again today, with another Archambault 35, Oliver Legrain’s IBA Sailing Team winning ahead of Dunkerque-les Dunes de Flandre, and Willem Wester’s Grand Soleil 37 Antilope taking third, while Raging Bee languished in fifth place. Dunkerque-les Dunes de Flandre is overall winner, one point ahead of Raging Bee, with IBA Sailing Team third overall, one point ahead of another JPK10.10, David Franks’ Strait Dealer.

Ian Braham’s MG346 Haven K-J Enigma started the day with an eight point cushion at the head of the IRC Class 5 fleet, while five boats were in strong contention for second place. There was plenty of loud action on the start line today, with a number of port/starboard incidents, including a brave competitor attempting a port tack flyer at the southern end of the line who was forced to bail out at the last minute. Braham was somewhat boxed in, as was Harry Heijst’s Sparkman and Stephens 41 Winsome. This allowed two J/92s, Robin Stevenson’s Upstart and Brian Malone’s Blue Diamond Dodjer get away into clean air.

Winsome won today’s race, ahead of Andy Howe’s J/97 Blackjack ll and Niek Spiljard’s X-332 Vanilla. Haven K-J Enigma was sixth but had a big enough cushion to retain the overall class win. Winsome’s result today lifted her up to second overall, one pint ahead of Vanilla.

A win today for Sam Laidlaw’s Quarter Tonner Aquila sealed his overall class win, three points ahead of Tony Hayward’s Blackfun. Louise Morton’s Bullit took second place today, her fifth podium result of the week, but it was not enough to lift her into second overall and she finished the series two points behind Hayward.

The first four Sigma 33s started the day only four points apart, giving each boat the possibility of taking the class title, although with a discard kicking in Toby Gorman’s Stan the Boat was able to discard nine points picked up when he retired on Monday. A win today therefore cemented his overall win, ahead of David Sanger’s Blues and Jeff Worboys’ Workout.

Chris and Roger Frost’s classic Swan 36 Finola started the day with a clear lead at the head of IRC Class 6, having sailed an impressively consistent regatta. Her second place finish today would have stretched her lead even further had she not subsequently been disqualified in the protest room. However, Finola remained as class winner even after discarding today’s result.

Third place today helped Simon Cory’s Cory Yachts 290 Icom Cool Blue into second place overall, while one of the seven Impala 28s, Sam Flint and Oliver Love’s Too Frank took third. A win in today’s race for Dudley Stock’s X-302 Xtract, saw him lifted into fourth place overall, ahead of Stuart Greenfield’s Half Tonner Silver Shamrock.

MANDARIN, IRC Class 7 – Copyright Paul Wyeth / CWL

IRC 7 is a smaller class, both in terms of numbers and boats, and includes several Folkboats, a beautiful wooden Stella and a pair of H-Boats. One of the latter, Jo Richards’ Woof again had a commanding lead on his competitors, with an almost complete sweep of race wins during the regatta. However, there was a tight three-way fight for second place between John Mulcahy’s Stella 26 Estrella, Ed and Bella Donald’s Folkboat Madelaine, and Paul Dunstan’s Folkboat Mandarin. The latter’s second place today lifted him into third overall, two points behind second-placed Madelaine and two ahead of Estrella.

The Sigma 38 class also has a convincing winner – Chris and Vanessa Choule’s With Alacrity counted six race wins. However, the competition for second overall was much closer, with Peter Hopps, Hilary Cook and Serena Alexander’s Sam finishing the series just two points ahead of Andrew Gordon’s third placed Quatrosolutions Pandanova.

Two boats have dominated the front of the Contessa 32 class all week – Ray Rouse’s Blanco and Eldred Himsworth’s Drumbeat, with the latter leading by just two points at the start of their final race. A fifth win for Himsworth sealed his position as overall winner, with a three-point margin. Rob Duke and Oli Donaghy’s Gualin took third overall, 13 points behind Blanco.

The J/109 class has enjoyed a high-scoring series, with six different race winners and 11 of the 25-strong fleet scoring at least one podium result. David Richards’ Jumping Jellyfish started the day at the top of the leaderboard, but a disappointing sixth place, after accepting a time penalty that cost three places, saw him finish the series in second place, three points behind overall winner Neil McGrigor’s Boo. A win in today’s race for Nick Burns’ Team Mandrake saw him take third overall, just one point behind Jumping Jellyfish and one point ahead of Christopher Sharples, Richard Acland and Patrick Tolhurst’s Jukebox.

A narrow win today for Martin Dent’s J/111 Jelvis, 35 seconds ahead of Paul van Driel’s Sweeny, narrowed the scores at the top of the leaderboard. However, third place today for Tony Mack’s McFly was still sufficient to secure his overall win, one point ahead of Jelvis. Sweeny ended the series in third overall, two points adrift of Jelvis’ score.

CyberArk and Sailing Forever started the day on equal points at the head of the Sunsail Match F40 fleet. A fourth consecutive win for the former saw the take overall victory, three points ahead of Sailing Forever, with Red Funnel in third place, just two points behind.

Both Cruiser divisions have been steadily growing in popularity over the past few years. Cruiser Division A saw close competition between Rob Denning’s Swan 46 Bewick of Cowes and Graham Nixon’s Elan 40 Magic, with the two boats just three points apart going into the final day. Second place in today’s race secured victory for Denning, two points ahead of Nixon. Third overall went to another Elan 40, Nik Atkinson and Frazer Venters’ Caveman.

Three very different boats rose to the top of Cruiser Division A. Peter Bainbridge’s modern classic Rustler 33 Whisper won by a comfortable margin, finishing the event with four race wins and only one result outside the top three. Jonathan and Pippa Wallis’ 1969 Swan 36 Sheevra took second overall, three points ahead of Ian Cooke’s 20ft Hunter Medina Tudor Rose.

White Group

JAT, J/80 – Copyright Paul Wyeth / CWL

The series points for most of the White Group dayboats finishes tomorrow, however four classes had their final race today. Kevin Sproul and Chris Taylor’s JAT started the day at the top the J/80 leaderboard, ahead of Chris Body’s Mocking Jay and Jon Powell’s Betty.

JAT and Mocking Jay again led away from the start, followed by Terence O’Neill’s Aqua J and Betty. JAT took her fourth consecutive win, 45 seconds ahead of Mike Lewis’ Jester, with Betty in third place only 18 seconds later. Mocking Jay finished in seventh place more than five minutes later, a result she was able to discard to remain in second place overall, two points ahead of Betty.

RIFF RAFF, RS Elite – Copyright Paul Wyeth / CWL

In the 20-strong RS Elite class Russell Peters’ Riff Raff started the day with a commanding lead over two boats vying for second overall, Ossie Stewart’s Aeolius and Nick Peters’ Way to Blue. The start of today’s race could not have been closer, with the bows of the 10 front-row boats all perfectly aligned. Of the small group of boats inshore Peter Smith’s Musto and Robert Holbrook and Jamie Berry’s Centurion were doing well, with Mike McIntyre’s Foudafafa and Paul Fisk’s Legs Eleven holding a narrow lead on a much bigger group of boats further offshore.

Nevertheless, Peters again rose to the front, notching up his fourth win of the regatta to finish on only 10 points. A fifth place today for Stewart saw him retain second overall on 26 points, while second place for Colin and Paul Smith’s Shaken not Stirred saw them rise to third overall on 30 points.

DANNY, Sunbeam – Copyright Paul Wyeth / CWL

Roger Wickens’ Sunbeam Danny again led the fleet by a large margin going into the final race, but there was a tight three-way fight for second place. Stewart Reed’s Firefly led the fleet into the line today with a half length advantage at the gun, although Peter Nicholson’s Dainty had better boat speed and was able to overtake to leeward. Humphrey Van der Klugt’s Misty was also well placed, on Firefly’s windward quarter, while Danny was distinctly buried in the second row.

Nevertheless, Danny escaped from her slow start to win, 55 seconds ahead of Misty, with John Ford’s Melody taking third place 37 seconds later. Melody’s result was sufficient to secure second overall, three points ahead of Richard Pearson’s Fay.

SHEARWATER II, Victory – Copyright Tom Gruitt

In the Victory class Mark and Joanna Dennington and Jim Downing’s Ziva went into the final race with a clear overall lead ahead of John Scammell and Maxine Reeves’ Zinnia, with Hugh Pringle’s Pelican third. However, with the discard only kicking in today, both Zinnia and Pelican were able to discard eighth places, while Ziva’s worst score was a fourth.

Zinnia won today’s race, with Duncan Evans’ Peregrine the second boat across the line. However, Evans took a time penalty for a rule infringement, which lifted Ziva into second place in today’s race. It was a decisive event that gave Ziva the overall class win, one point ahead of Zinnia. Pelican had a disappointing final race, finishing sixth, but still held on to third overall, one point ahead of Russell Mead’s Shearwater ll.

Racing continues tomorrow to conclude the series for the bulk of the White Group dayboat classes. Black Group yachts will also be on the water, competing for individual daily trophies.