Bequia Brief

Bequia Luxury Yacht Charter & Superyacht News

Another successful St. Barth’s Bucket for Stephens Waring-designed sailing yacht BEQUIA

April 07, 2015

Stephens Waring Design sailed aboard their 91’ sailing yacht Bequia in the granddaddy of superyacht regattas, the St. Barth’s Bucket. This year’s edition of the popular Caribbean regatta was once again marked by idyllic sailing conditions, gorgeous island scenery, and the vast spectacle of some of the finest yachts in the world.

Stephens Waring-designed Bequia Yacht at the 2015 St. Barths Bucket

Stephens Waring-designed Bequia Yacht at the 2015 St. Barths Bucket – Photo by BeverlyFactorSailing.com

Superyacht Bequia is almost toy-like among these huge multi-decker sloops and ketches, yet the elegant and restrained design turns heads while standing proudly at the top of the heap that make up much of the superyacht fleet. However, this year there were several entrants about her own size to spice up the competition, including some decidedly racy additions to the fleet— superyacht Freya, a 91’ Swan, and luxury yacht Cape Arrow, a 100’ Southern Wind sloop, both sleek and slippery modern upwind machines.

Luxury sailing yacht Bequia

Luxury sailing yacht Bequia – Photo by BeverlyFactorSailing.com

Day One featured the “Round the Island” race, a short beat up the southern side into 14-16 knots, followed by a bear-away to a jib reach then pop the kite for a long run to the western corner of the islets, culminating with a close reach to the finish. Bequia yacht is a witch on the reach and run, and the crew steam-rolled to the finish with a first in class—third in fleet.

Superyacht Bequia

Superyacht Bequia – Photo by BeverlyFactorSailing.com

Day Two was the “Not So Wiggley” course, winding around the starkly beautiful islands to the west of St. Barth’s, and again the crew pulled away on the reaches and runs, celebrating another first place finish. On the dock that night, it was rewarding to hear passing yachties call her, “by far the prettiest boat there.”

Luxury yacht Bequia

Luxury yacht Bequia – Photo by BeverlyFactorSailing.com

Day Three—the “Wrong Way Round”: features a long upwind leg in a sloppy sea, with little reaching and running.  On a long, shallow keel and yawl rig, the light winds at 9 kts, Bequia superyacht wishes for more. In a pursuit-style race, the time handicaps are assigned at the start, with each yacht having its own start time—the first across the finish is the winner. The crew slugged it out for sixth place to place 2nd in class. Mounting the podium the second year in a row was a good feeling.

The St. Barth’s Bucket Regatta—the sailing can’t be beat, and the fleet’s astounding.

Nauta-designed sailing yacht CAPE ARROW wins at St. Barths Bucket Regatta 2015

March 26, 2015

Nauta Design is excited to announce that sailing yacht Cape Arrow has won the St Barths Bucket Regatta in her category – Class C, Les Mademoiselles des Mers, after a record of three second places overall, ahead of Bequia yacht and luxury yacht Freya. Superyacht Cape Arrow is a beautiful 100-foot vessel, built by Southern Wind Shipyard and designed by Nauta and Farr Yacht Design in 2011.

Nauta-designed superyacht Cape Arrow at the 2015 St. Barths Bucket Regatta

Nauta-designed superyacht Cape Arrow at the 2015 St. Barths Bucket Regatta – Image credit to Ingrid Abery

Luxury yacht Cape Arrow was steered by Nauta Design’s passionate friend and client Mr. Pier Luigi Loro Piana, masterly supported by Tommaso Chieffi as tactician and by his excellent crew.

Nauta Design congratulates to the helmsman and the crew.

Below is a gallery for the luxurious charter yachts with design by Nauta.

An amazing start to the 2015 St Barths Bucket Regatta

March 20, 2015

Fort Oscar, directly across the harbor from the Capitainerie headquarters for the St. Barths Bucket, offered the perfect perch for watching the start of the first of three races planned over the next three days in the lovely Caribbean yacht charter location – St. Barths. And by the crowd that turned out there, it was clear that the majestic fleet of 35 superyachts would create an amazing spectacle as they kicked off their opening-day counter-clockwise circumnavigation of the island.

Luxury charter yacht Zenji at the 2015 St. Barths Bucket - Photo by Cory Silken

Luxury charter yacht Zenji at the 2015 St. Barths Bucket – Photo by Cory Silken

In medium winds and flat seas, Gazelles and Elegantes (Class A and Class B, respectively) took to the long course of 25.2 nautical miles, while the Mademoiselles and Grandes Dames made the medium course of 20.9 nautical miles their pleasure.

With four classes there could be only four winners, and today those were the 33-metre sloop Win Win, the 54.6 Vitters ketch Marie, the 27.7-metre sailing yacht Bequia and the 55.9 metre Perini Navi charter yacht Rosehearty.

Marie, which won her class and the coveted overall “Bucket” title last year, edged out long-time rival, the 44.6-metre superyacht Adela, in Gazelles by a minute and a half, even though Adela started 11 minutes ahead in the pursuit-style start.

Superyacht Adela sailing at the 2015 St. Barths Bucket - Photo by Cory Silken

Superyacht Adela sailing at the 2015 St. Barths Bucket – Photo by Cory Silken

“We were closing on her quite quickly on the penultimate leg when we were both running with our chutes toward the last bottom mark,” said Peter Wilson, one of Marie’s sail trimmers, “but it wasn’t until the last beat and 10 minutes before the finish that we actually got by her. We were both trying to lay the finish, and we had to get past them, so we put our bow down and tried to sail through them. We were abeam of them for quite a while.” Wilson explained that a left-hand shift helped Marie finally take the day. “We were clear ahead at that point, but it all depended on whether we had to tack to the finish or not. Had things gone a slightly different way, Adela could have beaten us, so the boats are well-matched and well-rated. ”

Rosehearty, winner in the nine-boat Grand Dames class, beat out charter yacht Zenji by about 13 minutes. Her tactician Paul Cayard said key to the crew’s success was practice, making no mistakes, and pushing the boat to its full potential.

“One of the biggest tricks with this boat is maneuverability,”said Cayard, who made his name in the Star class and as a skipper of America’s Cup and Volvo Ocean Race boats. “Maneuvering takes 10 times longer, so the key is to plan 12 minutes ahead. Having everyone know their roles and executing well is important.”

Sailing yacht Meteor at the 2015 St. Barths Bucket - Photo by Cory Silken

Sailing yacht Meteor at the 2015 St. Barths Bucket – Photo by Cory Silken

Though 15 seconds late on the start, Rosehearty tacked early at the first mark, which was critical to the entire race. “We were spot-on, which set us on a confident course.”

Class runner-up Zenji had started four minutes prior, and crew man Mike Toppa said it was when Rosehearty “cut the corner on us on the first beat” that they were first passed. “We caught up with them, got bow-to-bow, but they put their spinnaker up quicker,” he said. “They deserve to win.”

As for the first try here using the ORCsy rule, Toppa said, “I love it. We saw last week at Loro Piana that it was really accurate, and the test was the bigger boats and ketches – boats with more than one mast…how was it going to go? It was a really good starting point, much better than it has ever been before. Everyone’s positive and happy about it.”

Tom Whidden, another America’s Cup veteran with 12 or more Bucket regattas under his belt, agreed. (He is serving as tactician on the 37.2-metre Vitters sloop Ghost, which finished fifth today among the Gazelles.)

“If you didn’t like today, you don’t like sailing,” he said, describing conditions as “typical of St. Barths, with easterly trade winds ranging from 13-16 knots. “Change is always good, and owners are enthusiastic to see if there is a more equitable system than what we’ve been using. These boats are very difficult to handicap properly, and there are a lot of good, smart people who are trying to do that. As long as we have people who care about this involved (with the rule), we’ll do well. Afterall, you can’t find a more fantastic place to sail or more beautiful big boats in the world, so if we can find a way to make the racing better, more people will do it and everybody benefits.”

“Our goal was to keep this the way it always has been: an event by the industry for owners,” said Bruce Brakenhoff of Perini Navi, which joined Royal Huisman, Vitters Shipyard and Rybovich as joint stewards of the Bucket Regattas (a summer edition is held in Newport, R.I.) when the former owners were ready to pass the torch.

Sponsors of the St Barths Bucket Regatta are Alloy Yachts and Holland Jachtbouw. Supporting sponsors are Affinity Management Services, Burgess, Camper & Nicholsons, Doehle Yachts, Doyle Sailmakers, Dubois NA, Dykstra NA, Future Fibres, MTN, Newport Shipyard, North Sails, Pantaenius, Pendennis, Skuld Yacht, the Superyacht Report, Tradewind Aviation, US Trust, Willis, ZIS Insurance.

Stephens Waring-designed BEQUIA Yacht wins her class at St Barths Bucket 2014

April 08, 2014

Stephens Waring Yacht Design office is proud to announce that Bequia yacht – one of the company’s largest bespoke designs to date – won her class at St Barths Bucket Regatta 2014 at the end of last month. Launched by Brooklin Boat Yard in 2009, the modern classic sailing yacht Bequia is a beautiful and comfortable 90-foot yawl, easy to sail and, as she has now proved, extremely competitive. This follows her victory at the Loro Piana Superyacht Regatta, which took place in the fabulous Italy yacht charter destination – Porto Cervo in Sardinia in June 2013.

Stephens Waring-designed 90' sailing yacht Bequia - Photo credit to Langley Photography

Stephens Waring-designed 90' sailing yacht Bequia - Photo credit to Langley Photography

Luxury superyacht Bequia clinched her overall victory with a second place in the final race beating charter yacht Moonbird, a Dubois/Fitzroy sloop which is 10 metres longer. A proud owner commented: “Paul Campbell James and the rest of Bequia’s crew did some amazing sailing on the prettiest yacht in the fleet!”

St Barths Bucket 2014: Day 3

March 30, 2014

Racing at the 2014 St Barths Bucket concluded today, with some class wins decided by mere seconds. The third and final day of competing of the three-day series presented winds that again enabled a quick pace around the race course, this time in a “wrong way” (clockwise direction) around the island that measured 24,5 nautical miles for the Gazelle and Elegante classes and 21 for the Grande Dames and Mademoiselles.

St Barths Bucket 2014 - Photo by clairematches.com

St Barths Bucket 2014 - Photo by clairematches.com

Perhaps most dramatically, the Perini Navi superyacht Clan VIII finished a mere five seconds ahead of mega yacht Seahawk in Grande Dames class, preventing another Perini Navi Seahawk from snatching victory overall and allowing Altair to slip in and take the top spot on the scoreboard. “If it had been the other way around and we had finished ahead of Clan VIII by five seconds, we would’ve won the class,” said Seahawk’s captain Robert “Johnno” Jonstone, who called it a roller coaster day, “so exciting, but so draining.”

Right at the start, his team’s giant spinnaker, with over 1000 square metres of sail cloth, filled before it got to the lock at the top of the mast, and the halyard broke. “We crossed the line dragging it in the water,” said Jonstone, “but we pulled it out and wooled it up; then while sailing on the backside of the island, we sent someone up the rig to sort things and change the lock over-it was an amazing effort.” The Seahawk team then mustered the confidence to hoist the spinnaker again on the relatively short downwind stretch to the finish line, but bad luck was still riding with them. “We had 500 metres to go to the finish, and when the halyard went up it wouldn’t jam in the lock.”

Clan VIII and Seahawk crossed the finish line in third and fourth, with the Perini Navi superyacht Silencio and sailing yacht Altair taking first and second, respectively. In final cumulative scoring, Altair was one point ahead of Seahawk, with Silencio falling into third and Clan VIII finishing sixth.

The Vitters-built luxury yacht Marie also had a tantalizingly close finish with Royal Huisman superyacht Unfurled and sailing yacht Varsovie to win the Elegantes class and, in addition, overall honors, based on turning in the best cumulative score (6 points on the merit of a 1-3-2 scoreline) from among all classes.

“We had to win today, or if Varsovie won (which she did), we had to at least beat Unfurled,” said Peter Wilson, who managed Marie’s build and served as her safety officer here. Marie finished second to Varsovie, and Unfurled finish third, close enough to Marie that when Wilson was asked how far she was behind, he laughed and said, “40.1 meters!” It is 40 meters that must be left between these superyachts at all times while racing in order to insure that no collisions occur, and it is because of this international superyacht rule that safety officers have great say in all decisions made by their afterguards.

Wilson said decisions had to be made quickly, especially on the backside of the island where the wind got very shifty. “We got in the traffic of the Perinis and that was an enormous part of our strategic plan for what happened next,” said Wilson, explaining that his team helped force Unfurled into the bad air of the Perini Navi charter yacht Parsifal III, which caused Unfurled to have to jibe away and lose precious time.

Luxury yacht Nilaya finished fourth today in the Gazelles class, and that performance, combined with two second-place finishes from Friday’s and Saturday’s racing, was strong enough to give her class victory. The largest yacht here at 66.7m/216′ mega yacht Hetairos, won today’s race, with superyacht Visione taking second, landing the latter yacht in runner-up position overall.

For Mademoiselles, it was superyacht Bequia that made the power play to knock charter yacht Moonbird from her first-place perch secured yesterday. Again, it was down to the wire at the finish, with the Alloy yacht Blue Too, Bequia, Moonbird and luxury yacht Sarafin, in that order, finishing within five minutes of each other.

“The take-away is that I don’t know if there has ever been a better-weather Bucket than this,” said Event Director and Race Chairman Peter Craig. “It was 15-20 knots, moderate-to-upper-end for three days, which was challenging for sailors and fabulous for spectators. Sailing to the superyacht rule can be a burden to get used to, but the level to which everyone sailed… you’d think you were at a conventional regatta.”

Major sponsors for the St. Barths Bucket are Alloy Yachts, Holland Jachtbouw, Perini Navi, Royal Huisman and Vitters Shipyard.

Supporting sponsors are Burgess, Camper & Nicholson, Doehle Yachts, Doyle, Future Fibres, Newport Shipyard, North Sails, Pantaenius, Pendennis, Rybovich, Skuld Yacht, the Superyacht Report, Tradewind Aviation, US Trust, and ZIS Insurance.

Taittinger Champagne and Barbeyrolles Rose are official suppliers.

The four class winners will each receive a beautiful, handcrafted Ship’s Bell Clock from Chelsea Clock.

New to the 2014 Bucket –  The Golden Pineapple Award, Sponsored by Hotel St Barth Isle de France. The Bucket Directors have added this award to the 2014 edition of the St Barths Bucket to reward an essential element of the event, who will WIN THE PARTY?

Racing concluded on Sunday March 30.

St Barths Bucket 2014: Day 2

March 29, 2014

It sounded rather funny for sailors to be talking about a “Not So Wiggley Course” with such reverence, dockside at the 2014 St Barths Bucket, this morning. However, when the day came to its end and a second of three races had concluded, it was quite clear why.

St Barths Bucket Regatta 2014 - Photo by clairematches.com

St Barths Bucket Regatta 2014 - Photo by clairematches.com

Mademoiselle, Elegante and Gazelle classes took on the long version (27.1 nm) of the course, which started on the west side of St. Barths and wound its way around smaller islands and rocks to the north, while the Grande Dames sailed the shorter version (22 nm) in winds that were a few knots less than yesterday’s yet just as feisty. The “not so” in the course description was obviously tongue-in-cheek, as the 38 superyachts -ranging in size from 27.5m/88′ to 66.7m/216′-zigged and zagged more than the usual number of times while crews executed numerous sail changes as well as spinnaker hoists and takedowns, alternately winding their charges up to gain advantage, then dialing them down to safely share close quarters at rounding marks with their magnificently sized competitors.

Leading in the Elegantes class after finishing third today and combining that with a first from yesterday is the 54 m/180′ Vitters Ketch Marie, whose tactician Tony Rey, in describing his day, was beaming like a little kid who had just gotten away with something bigger than he expected.

“Anybody who says superyacht racing is champagne and cocktails and taking it easy hasn’t been to The Bucket,” he said. “It’s an absolutely spectacular exercise in teamwork to get these things around the track.”

Rey said he was pleased with Marie yacht’s start and the first third of the leg but then encountered the classic situation of gaining so much that suddenly the team was in the mix with way more boats than he was comfortable with. “It was just mildly terrifying, which is a typical feeling in the afterguards at Bucket Regattas,” said Rey, who counts this as his fifth Bucket Regatta aboard Marie. “This means we’re having a good day.”

Marie superyacht’s crew had a few missteps with its maneuvers (including “breaking a spinnaker and putting it in the water”), but others in the class did, as well, and six boats were abreast coming around Roche Table.

“It was absolutely spectacular; there were 40 meters on each side,” Rey said, alluding to the International Superyacht Rule that requires boats to leave 40 meters in all directions between themselves and their competitors. “I didn’t need sun screen because there was shade from all the sails.”

Mega yacht Seahawk, in Grande Dames class, hit the rocks off Roche Table but was able to clear itself and sail to fifth, nevertheless, claiming the top spot on the leaderboard for a second day.

When superyacht Clan VIII briefly lost its steering at the same spot, it infringed on the rights of charter yacht Zenji, causing Zenji to miss a turning mark, but, as is the case in most such Bucket instances, the Clan crew gracefully accepted its penalty and no doubt plans to supply some drinks to the Zenji crew at the Bucket Bash later this evening.

“This was the kind of day that taxes bow and mast teams first because of the physical hoists and drops,” said Jonathan Kline, the safety officer aboard Clan VIII yacht, “then safety officers and tacticians second because of the close quarters of the ‘wiggly’ course, with the fleets converging and crossing.”

Luxury yacht Cape Arrow won the Gazelle class today with less than six minutes separating her from second-place finisher superyacht Nilaya, but the two are inverted on the overall scoreboard for Nilaya’s advantage going into tomorrow’s final race.

Charter yacht Moonbird has the most consistent finishes (2-2) in Mademoiselle class to lead overall, with superyacht Bequia having fallen to second from first yesterday.

Major sponsors for the St. Barths Bucket are Alloy Yachts, Holland Jachtbouw, Perini Navi, Royal Huisman and Vitters Shipyard.

Supporting sponsors are Burgess, Camper & Nicholson, Doehle Yachts, Doyle, Future Fibres, Newport Shipyard, North Sails, Pantaenius, Pendennis, Rybovich, Skuld Yacht, the Superyacht Report, Tradewind Aviation, US Trust, and ZIS Insurance.

Taittinger Champagne and Barbeyrolles Rose are official suppliers.

The four class winners will each receive a beautiful, handcrafted Ship’s Bell Clock from Chelsea Clock.

New to the 2014 Bucket –  The Golden Pineapple Award, Sponsored by Hotel St Barth Isle de France. The Bucket Directors have added this award to the 2014 edition of the St Barths Bucket to reward an essential element of the event, who will WIN THE PARTY?

Racing concludes on Sunday March 30.

St Barths Bucket 2014: Day 1

March 28, 2014

This morning at the docks in Gustavia Harbour saw 17 of 38 superyachts get ready for the 2014 St Barths Bucket. It took well more than an hour for the lot to leave, one by one and in planned order, but only after divers had cleared their bow anchors, allowing them to join the balance of the fleet, the 20-some-odd-mile race around the island of St. Barths on the Caribbean Sea kicked off.

Mega yacht Seahawk at the St. Barths Bucket 2014 - Photo by Tim Wright/photoaction.com

Mega yacht Seahawk at the St. Barths Bucket 2014 - Photo by Tim Wright/photoaction.com

Yesterday’s forecast of heavy winds, which could have possibly posed a threat to racing, thankfully did not come to fruition, and a more accommodating 20-knot breeze allowed the four classes (Gazelles, Elegantes, Mademoiselles and Grandes Dames) to strut their extraordinarily beautiful stuff in front of a large spectator fleet and curious eyes that peered from various vantage points along the shore and on the cliffs and peaks of the island’s mere 21 sq. kilometers (8 sq. miles) of volcanic land.

“Everyone was a little nervous, but it ended up being a really nice day,” said John Barrett, navigator aboard the 27.5m/90′ yawl Bequia, which won the Mademoiselle class and was the very first yacht to cross the line after approximately two and ½ hours of racing, with the 37m/122′ charter yacht Moonbird tantalizingly close behind. “With pursuit racing that’s how it should be,” said Barrett, estimating a 10 second delta between the two yachts. “It means they got the ratings (based on the international superyacht rule) right.”

Barrett described seeing the Grandes Dames, in the class starting before his, taking long tacks upwind to Roches Rouges before cracking off to Les Grenadiers and subsequent way points of Ile Toc Vers and Ile Fourchue (located between St. Barths and St. Martin), while Bequia chose toshort-tack closer to shore to minimize the effects of a lumpy sea state. After the rounding of Ile Fourchue, it was then a “drag race” back to the finish. (The Grande Dames sailed an additional 3.5nm on a course that took them around Roche Table, Groupers and Petite Groupers before heading back.) “It was especially challenging near Shell Beach where the wind coming across the island got patchy. One minute we were standing up straight and another minute we were on our ear.”

Mega yacht Seahawk, luxury yacht Marie and superyacht Visione won the Grande Dames, Elegantes and Gazelles classes, respectively.

“We are 550 tons, which is pretty heavy,” said David Powys, the Australian tactician aboard the newly launched superyacht Seahawk, adding that gusts of 25-26 knots were quite handy for moving the boat along. “To be honest, today was our day (as opposed to tomorrow, which promises to be lighter), and if we hadn’t have won, we would’ve been disappointed. As for our rating, we couldn’t have been more happy, as there were six of us who finished within a minute or two.”

Powys likened the Bucket to a traditional car rally where very good friends meet, enjoy some social events and then race in ernesty yet with great reverence to the spirit of tradition. “This race gets more and more competitive each year, but we have to remember its original essence.”

Organizers stress that the success of the Bucket Regattas (there is one each summer in Newport, R.I., as well) rests on an emphasis that is more upon wholesome fun and safe racing than winning. To that point, tonight, after daily awards are presented, the race will be for best of show at the much-anticipated dock party and fleet open house.

Major sponsors for the St. Barths Bucket are Alloy Yachts, Holland Jachtbouw, Perini Navi, Royal Huisman and Vitters Shipyard.

Supporting sponsors are Burgess, Camper & Nicholson, Doehle Yachts, Doyle, Future Fibres, Newport Shipyard, North Sails, Pantaenius, Pendennis, Rybovich, Skuld Yacht, the Superyacht Report, Tradewind Aviation, US Trust, and ZIS Insurance.

Taittinger Champagne and Barbeyrolles Rose are official suppliers.

The four class winners will each receive a beautiful, handcrafted Ship’s Bell Clock from Chelsea Clock.

New to the 2014 Bucket –  The Golden Pineapple Award, Sponsored by Hotel St Barth Isle de France. The Bucket Directors have added this award to the 2014 edition of the St Barths Bucket to reward an essential element of the event, who will WIN THE PARTY?

Racing continues on Saturday March 29 and for the first time; live race tracking enhances the Bucket experience for friends, families and fans of the Bucket.

New season launched in style by Stephens Waring Yacht Design at New York Yacht Club

March 21, 2014

Bob Stephens, co-founder of Stephens Waring Yacht Design, and Alison Langley, bespoke marine photographer, were hosted by the New York Yacht Club on Wednesday evening, March 19, 2014. They displayed their exciting plans for the upcoming season.

Stephens, Waring and White Designed superyacht Bequia, 90 ft ketch built by Brooklin Boatyard, Maine

Stephens, Waring and White designed superyacht Bequia, 90 ft ketch built by Brooklin Boatyard, Maine - Photo credit to Langley Photography

In the crowded Model Room over 70 guests were treated to an evening of elegance and entertainment as Stephens, known for producing some of the world’s most stylish and reputable modern day classics, talked about the development of Spirit of Tradition/Modern Classics. He spoke passionately about the rich heritage of yacht design and production, and highlighted the fact that these boats do not replace classic yachts but instead, complement them.

Stephens, who has been at the forefront of developing the Spirit of Tradition concept since its inception in the early 1990s, said:
“There’s a desire for people to have new objects that feel like old objects – objects that are obviously hand-crafted by caring expert artisans. A true modern classic faithfully delivers on that front, but also delivers an equally carefully engineered and sophisticated modern experience in structure, performance, and comfort.”

Included in Stephens many featured yachts last night, was superyacht Bequia – one of Stephens Waring Yacht Design’s largest bespoke designs to date. Built five years ago, this 90ft yawl has all the characteristics of a modern classic, and her owners take pleasure in her not only because she is comfortable, easy to sail, and competitive, but also because she is aesthetically very pleasing. Her busy 2014 calendar kicks off at the end of this month at St Barths Bucket Regatta.

Luxury sailing yacht Bequia - Photo credit to Langley Photography

Luxury sailing yacht Bequia - Photo credit to Langley Photography

In addition to the informative chat, and splendid array of accompanying Langley images, Stephens revealed some particularly exciting news including the forthcoming International Yacht & Aviation Awards in which two of Stephens Waring Yacht Design entries – Citronella and Rapture are short-listed. The awards presentation takes place in London in May.

Other projects lined-up for the year include Stephens Waring Yacht Design’s presence at the Palm Beach International Boat Show (20-23 March) in a supporting role for Todd French, of French and Webb – builders. One of this company’s latest projects is the Zogo – a stylish and innovative hybrid propulsion system boat.

Stephens commented: “We have thought for a long time Zogo would be well-suited to the Intracoastal Waterway and canals of South Florida, so this is an opportunity to introduce the boat to the boating populace and educate them about the great features of her hybrid propulsion system.”

Bequia Yacht - Interior - Photo credit to Langley Photography

Bequia Yacht - Interior - Photo credit to Langley Photography

Stephens also sees his visit to the show as a great opportunity to pursue the latest developments in the south Florida boating scene and in powerboat design. He said: “This is a rapidly growing segment of our business with more and more clients requesting elegant, well-performing and stylish powerboats.”

Commenting on last night’s sell-out event at the NYYC, Stephens said: “It was a great thrill to address the members in that hallowed space, and a pleasure to see old friends among the audience.

“Alison’s images were truly impressive on the big screen, and we had a spirited discussion about the revival of the classic class and the rise of the Spirit of Tradition phenomenon. The backdrop of a century-and-a-half of yacht design spelled out in the models surrounding us gave a great ambience to the evening.”

Stephens Waring Yacht Design: Design, Life and Jazz

March 07, 2014

Having served the yachting community for over 20 years, the US full-service yacht design firm, Stephens Waring Yacht Design, specializes in custom and production projects. The company has worked on such superb vessels as their flagship 91-foot superyacht BEQUIA as well as the 75-foot sailing yacht ISOBEL.

Sailing yacht Bequia designed by Stephens Waring

Sailing yacht Bequia designed by Stephens Waring

As stated by Stephens Waring Yacht Design: “For years, we’ve been telling people we have the best job in the world. We get to meet exciting, dynamic people, collaborate with them to solve challenging problems, and create beautiful, spirited boats, all in an inspiring studio space.

Our studio takes up the entire top floor of a gorgeous 1885 brick building in downtown Belfast, Maine. At street level, enter the antique Victorian-era doors and climb the creaking stairway to the studio entrance where a two story foyer welcomes you into our crisp, modern space – marking a transformation out of yesterday’s historic decor into vibrant and inspiring themes exuding a spare, fresh reality. It’s a space for creativity – an atmosphere that’s intrinsic to the work we do.

The studio of Stephens Waring Yacht Design

The studio of Stephens Waring Yacht Design

Under a soaring skylight that lets soft northern light flow into the drafting room, we conduct our day’s work. From this inspirational space flow the designs with our signature—innovative blends of tradition and modern performance. One of us will take lead on each project—the choice made by affinity with our client.  Yet each partner is intimately close to all the work coming from the studio – like a refined jazz performance where the music is like a conversation between musicians, these designs are shaped by the input and synergy from the partners of Stephens and Waring – each offering up ideas, notes, that begin to make up the phrases for each riff until it sounds like the right tune.

Stephens and Waring: two good friends, a conversation of design on the table, like notes played in a duet.  And with a soft din of blues and jazz in the background, we create – Innovation Inspired by Tradition™ – a great day on the job.”

Update from crew of 91′ Brooklin Boat Yard sailing yacht BEQUIA

December 09, 2013

Last month saw the US shipyard, Brooklin Boat Yard receive a wonderful letter from the crew of sailing yacht Bequia. Named after ‘Bequia‘, a small island in St Vincent and the Grenadines, positioned among the Windward Islands in the popular yacht charter destination – the Caribbean, superyacht Bequia is a majestic 91-foot world-cruising yawl, built by Brooklin Boat Yard to a design by Stephens Waring in 2009. Below is the letter sent by the crew of Bequia.

Brooklin Boat Yard-built superyacht BEQUIA in the popular Mediterranean yacht charter location - Montenegro

Brooklin Boat Yard-built superyacht BEQUIA in the popular Mediterranean yacht charter location - Montenegro - Image courtesy of Brooklin Boat Yard

16.48 North, 62.01 West
To: Steve White and the Boys of the Brooklin Boat Yard.

“Some seven years ago, [we] commissioned the Brooklin Boat Yard to build a 91′ yawl. In the early summer of 2009 Bequia was lowered into the waters of Center Harbor, and as a wooden boat, joined the fleet of wooden boats built under the direction of the White family. We were deeply honored.

There was something sincerely satisfying to be part of a sailing yacht that shares a connection with boats like Grace, Vortex, and the beautiful Wild Horses. So many boats of “sculptural composition and curved lines” paying homage to the artistry of boat building and the universal beauty of a sailing vessel, have called Center Harbor home. To her owners’ eyes, Bequia was a magnificent realization of a dream, and we felt deeply indebted to the craftsman that built her, and the family of boats she joined.

The boys of BBY labored to build a “safe, strong, and seaworthy boat”. A yacht that could take a family safely anywhere in the world. And a boat whose beauty and warmth — lined with cedar, ash, and teak — would provide physical comfort and visual joy to those that sailed on her.

We thank again, Brian, Eric, and the rest of the crew that built Bequia.

Steve once wrote, wishfully, that Bequia “would have her own history and place in the world.”

I hope we have made a first step in the foundation of such a history. Bequia has sailed into the bay of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. She has traveled south to the San Blas Islands, anchoring off Achodup, perhaps the prettiest atoll in the Gulf of Mexico. She has gone north east to Sweden and cruised the archipelago of Stockholm. Bequia spent two days in the Stora Nassa Skargard, on the edge of the Baltic Sea, where father and daughter braved the cold and jumped in the sea.

And we raced Bequia against some of the finest yachts of Europe. In 2012 in England, in the Penndennis Cup, Bequia came in third in class. In the 2013, Loro Piana Super Yacht regatta, in Sardinia, Italy, Bequia let her skirt fly, and finished first in class. (With a little help from a tactician named Whidden, and a helmsman named Campbell James).

We are arriving in the next hours to anchor in Falmouth Harbor, Antigua, after an eleven day crossing of the great Atlantic Ocean, captained by Seumas Meharg. We are sailing under yankee, staysail, main, and mizzen. For her owner, the crossing was fulfilling an adventure harbored for years.

I hope, Steve, we have respected the history of your yard, and honored the work of those that built Bequia.

[We] are grateful.”